The Scuttlefish

Love the Ocean. Wish you were here.

Pirate Radio: A Visual History

by Owen James Burke

radiocaroline 640x482 Pirate Radio: A Visual History

Above: Ronan O’Rahilly’s MV Ross Revenge, home of Radio Caroline and her impressive 300-foot “mast,” or radio tower if you like. This was one of the last of Radio Caroline’s ships.

The concept of offshore broadcasting for entertainment was first explored by the Royal Crown in the early 19th century, but decades went by before Radio Caroline established itself and the term “pirate radio” was coined.

But long before there was Ronan O’Rahilly and Radio Caroline in the 1960s, there was the S.S. City of Panama, a cargo ship hired by the Panamanian government to promote U.S. tourism to the country. Instead, it began broadcasting popular music under the call sign “RXKR” off the California coast in 1933. Within just three months, the station was shut down at the request of the U.S. Department of State. Read more »

This Louisiana Couple Is Outfitting a Private Yacht to Save Refugees in the Mediterranean Sea

by Owen James Burke

maltamoas 640x423 This Louisiana Couple Is Outfitting a Private Yacht to Save Refugees in the Mediterranean Sea

Above: The Malta-based Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) makes its first rescue in August 2014. Since, they’ve rescued more than 3,000. Photo: Barcroft Media /Landov

Every day, derelict ships, small wooden boats and even dinghies set out to sea from North Africa carrying refugees who are stuffed together “like sardines.” Record numbers of refugees from Africa and beyond are attempting the perilous passage across the Mediterranean in vessels unfit for the sea, but according to NPR, Amnesty International’s Matteo de Bellis has released a statement saying, “No European country has a search and rescue operation dedicated to saving migrants at sea, something that’s becoming a near daily occurrence.”

catrambone 640x425 This Louisiana Couple Is Outfitting a Private Yacht to Save Refugees in the Mediterranean Sea

Louisiana businessmen, humanitarian, adventurer and MOAS cofounder Christopher Catrambone. Photo: Leila Fadel/NPR

Enter Lake Charles, Louisiana businessman Christopher Catrambone and his Italian wife. Catrambone and wife Regina were cruising the Mediterranean when she spotted a jacket floating eerily in the middle of the sea. Pointing it out to a crew member, she learned that it likely belonged to a refugee who perished during an attempted passage. After further research into the matter, the couple were appalled by the lack of sympathy in Europe for those struggling to escape conflict in Africa and the Middle East.

Since, the couple has relocated to Malta where they have purchased the Phoenix, a 40 meter, $8 million dollar yacht and hired crew to form a vigilante rescue operation, the Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS). MOAS was only established last summer and it’s likely the only organization of its kind, but alone they’ve already saved thousands.

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If You Thought Standup Paddleboarding Was Too Leisurely for Surfing, Watch This Video

by Owen James Burke

Screen Shot 2015 03 27 at 1.58.13 PM 640x357 If You Thought Standup Paddleboarding Was Too Leisurely for Surfing, Watch This Video

When standup paddleboarding becomes a casual sport of seated beer swilling. Screenshot from Magicseaweed Surf’s video

This guy, legs crossed, could be just as easily be sitting in this beach chair beneath an umbrella on the sand, tilting a bottle of beer back as a he blindly and cooly navigates his way across the face of a wave. It’s not something you’ll see me trying (or succeeding at) any time soon–at least until my legs give out–but I’ve got to hand it to him for his aptitude.

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Animal Shred: Surfer turned Artist Kate Barattini Blends Waves with Animals in this ‘Surf and Turf’ Inspired Exhibit

by Carolyn Sotka

butterfly Animal Shred: Surfer turned Artist Kate Barattini Blends Waves with Animals in this ‘Surf and Turf’ Inspired Exhibit

Monarch Shred. Courtesy of Kate Barattini.

Kate Barattini’s exhibit Animal Shred is a series that expresses the animal soul of surfers. While surfers shred and glide they are exposing the truest part of their animal existence. A fleshly pleasure that holds no remorse just as non-human animals experience all of their lives.

Animal Shred opens at The Charleston Music Hall on April 23rd , 2015. In her words, here is her inspiration for the collection.

Animal Shred was inspired by people. The surfing kind of people. While all folks are animals all of the time, when we find the water we’re absolute animals, and it is evident when looking through photos of my favorite sliders. 

 This whole idea began when this one photo of a lady slider, Kassia Meador, surfing in Mexico caught my eye. She’s hanging heels in the image and all my mind could think was, ‘man, that would look stunning if she had monarch butterfly wings’.

A while later that idea came to life. The rest of the series blossomed from there. I spent countless hours perusing online image searches of surfers doing their thing and chose the ones that beckoned for a new and improved animal head. Many of the bodies used in the paintings were inspired by the surfers Craig Anderson, Alex Knost, and Kassia Meador. They’re all surfers known for their very rad, unique styles and I personally cannot keep my eyes off of them when they’re in the water.

My focus was to keep the paintings as realistic as my ability would allow and make the animal head somewhat subtle. The idea was to have the paintings be tongue-in-cheek but maintain the surfer’s and wave’s beauty.  Something that would keep the viewer smiling no matter how many times they see the piece.”

kate1 Animal Shred: Surfer turned Artist Kate Barattini Blends Waves with Animals in this ‘Surf and Turf’ Inspired Exhibit

Antelope Shred. Courtesy of Kate Barattini.

kate 9 Animal Shred: Surfer turned Artist Kate Barattini Blends Waves with Animals in this ‘Surf and Turf’ Inspired Exhibit

Lion Shred. Courtesy of Kate Barattini.

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Growing Up a Surfer and Rasta in Jamaica Part II. Billy and Maggie Wilmot, and Our Surfing Family. A Scuttlefish Feature.

by Inilek Wilmot

1989 Bull Bay Ishack Inilek Icah 1 640x445 Growing Up a Surfer and Rasta in Jamaica Part II. Billy and Maggie Wilmot, and Our Surfing Family. A Scuttlefish Feature.

Rude Boys. Photo courtesy of Inilek Wilmot.

My parents Anthony (Billy) and Claudette (Maggie) Wilmot were both Rastafari when I was welcomed into this world. At the time, the Rastafari movement was becoming more established, but still going through crucial stages of development and was viewed by society through a mix of lenses tinted with suspicion, ridicule, mystique and fear, but it was also demanding and commanding respect. When I was born, my father was the best surfer on the island of Jamaica. This didn’t mean much to most people, but would eventually mean the world to me.

Maggie Imani Inilek Icah Ishack 436x640 Growing Up a Surfer and Rasta in Jamaica Part II. Billy and Maggie Wilmot, and Our Surfing Family. A Scuttlefish Feature.

Mom and the kids. Maggie Imani Inilek Icah Ishack. Photo courtesy of Inilek Wilmot.

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Wish You Were Here: Asturias, Spain

by Owen James Burke

asturias2 640x370 Wish You Were Here: Asturias, Spain

A wave folds in Asturias, Spain, glistening beneath a Basque sunset. Photo: Manuel Toral

Photographer Manuel Toral was fortunate enough to be born in Asturias in northern Spain, a place of majestic waves and light. These are just a few of his photographs from his portfolio.

asturias1 640x370 Wish You Were Here: Asturias, Spain

Morning fog blankets the spoonful of water that lies between the hills. Photo: Manuel Toral

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The Mystery of the Chinese Flag Discovered on a WWII Japanese Shipwreck off Palau

by Owen James Burke

Screen Shot 2015 03 25 at 7.00.42 PM 640x358 The Mystery of the Chinese Flag Discovered on a WWII Japanese Shipwreck off Palau

This Chinese flag was discovered fastened to a 1944 WWII Japanese shipwreck, and no one knows who did it. Screenshot from Kyodo News’ YouTube video (below)

Japanese divers returning to the site of the Japanese warship Iro were very distressed when they came upon the newly fixed ensign aboard what is not only an archeological site, but a graveyard for many of their countrymen.

The meter-long flag had been attached to the remnants of the ship’s stern with zip ties, and it was reported that whoever (or whichever organization) placed it there had gone to some trouble in order to do so.

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These Are the Intricately Animated Sculptures of a “Natural History Surrealist”

by Owen James Burke

octopus1 640x498 These Are the Intricately Animated Sculptures of a Natural History Surrealist

Octopus, bedazzled with butterflies. Photo: Ellen Jewett Sculpture

Ellen Jewett uses her background in science to sculpt lifelike, (almost) anatomically correct flora and fauna using nothing but her hands and a paintbrush.

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